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Leverage your laziness

Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for Nonfiction

Below are the five finalists for Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for Nonfiction. The Weston Prize is worth $60,000.
1. The Inconvenient Indian by Thomas King 2. The Once and Future World by J.B. 3. The Dogs are Eating them Now by Graeme Smith 4. The Great Escape by Andrew Steinmetz 5. Projection by Priscilla Uppal
And the Jurors are: Samantha Nutt Evan Solomon
Hal Niedzviecki
Candace Savage
Andreas Schroeder

Congratulations to all the finalists. 

Compact Houses by Gerald Rowan

Scotiabank Giller Prize Longlist

Dennis Bock for his novel Going Home Again, published by HarperCollins CanadaJoseph Boyden for his novel The Orenda, published by Hamish Hamilton CanadaLynn Coady for her short story collection Hellgoing, published by House of Anansi PressCraig Davidson for his novel Cataract City, published by Doubleday CanadaElisabeth De Mariaffi for her short story collection How To Get Along With Women, published by Invisible PublishingDavid Gilmour for his novel Extraordinary, published by Patrick Crean EditionsWayne Grady for his novel Emancipation Day, published by Doubleday CanadaLouis Hamelin for his novel October 1970, translated by Wayne Grady and published by House of Anansi Press   Wayne Johnston for his novel The Son of a Certain Woman, published by Knopf CanadaClaire Messud for her novel The Woman Upstairs, published by Knopf CanadaLisa Moore for her novel Caught, published by House of Anansi PressDan Vyleta for his novel The Crooked Maid, published by HarperCollins CanadaMichael Winter…

And The Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini

As the #1 New York Times-bestselling author of The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns, Khaled Hosseini already knows a thing of two about capturing our attention with emotional characters that both warm the cockles of our hearts and boil the blood in our veins. In his new novel, And The Mountains Echoed, he has once again juxtaposed memorable characters against a backdrop of history, making this creation another haunting page-turner.
The book begins with a father telling a fable to his children (Abdullah and Pari) about farmer called Baba Ayub, who is forced to give his favourite son Qais (only three years old) to the div (demon) as an offering. The innocent siblings listen to their father’s story (that actually foreshadows their own life) with interest, unaware their own lives are on the brink of being shattered, the repercussions of which will echo through generations.
When three-year old Pari is given away to a rich couple in Kabul who can’t have a child of their own, it is t…